Posts in Central America

Nicaraguan families learn together through farmer-to-farmer exchanges

FRB’s Nicaragua-Mateare program addresses food security issues in one of Latin America’s most food-insecure countries by training farmers in sustainable agriculture practices, and making sure that mothers with children ages 5 and under understand basic health practices, the importance of a balanced diet, and safe food preparation.

This integrated approach – growing enough food and ensuring that it is used to its best advantage for the health and wellbeing of all family members – is key to the success of the program. In Nicaragua, 1.2 million people are affected by hunger, environmental deterioration, chronic poverty, lack of potable water and insufficient food.

02/25/2014 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Communities Strengthened through organic gardening in Mexico

FRB’s Mexico-Chiapas program is addressing challenges of poor nutrition, poverty, and loss of population from migration due to global policies beyond the control of the community. The program promotes food security by supporting families’ organic crops, fruit trees, and vegetable gardens.

Access to water is limited, so efforts are focused on collecting water in tanks for irrigating staple crops like beans and corn, and water conservation practices in family gardens. Many families are cultivating depleted land, and are benefiting from training on

01/13/2014 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

La Roya Epidemic Decimating Livelihoods Dependent on Coffee in Honduras

Please keep the people of Central America and FRB's Honduras Nueva Frontera Program in your thoughts and prayers as they struggle with how the Coffee Rust epidemic is affecting their livelihoods.

Central America is undergoing the worst Coffee Rust plague since 1976. The state of phytosanitary emergency (measures for the control of plant diseases) has been declared in Costa Rica, Guatemala and Honduras.

The Coffee Rust Plague, also known as La Roya, is caused by a fungus that affects the leaves and destroys crops and plants. Once it attacks, the only option for most farmers is to destroy an entire coffee plantation

11/19/2013 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

In Nicaragua, positive change really happens in program communities

“Do you see change taking place in your work?” People often ask me,  as Country Consultant of World Renew (WR) programming in Nicaragua, I recently joined an FRB/WR team that evaluated the Nicaragua-Farmer program in the households “have access to sufficient, safe, and nutritious food during the entire year.” We saw evidence of much positive change among participants, for whom the program’s goal is to ensure that allcentral mountain region of the country.

06/05/2013 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Learning Through Doing

Three FRB work learning groups recently returned from Guatemala and Nicaragua. These intergenerational groups went deeper in our learning about FRB as we spent more time in each local community than happens in a regular FRB visit. We supported people in work they were doing for their own communities.

05/20/2013 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

In Guatemala, Roberto Satisfies Passion for Farming with Training

Roberto, a longtime farmer and member of one of the communities served by FRB’s Guatemala-Four Departments program, is taking good advantage of the appropriate farming techniques he’s learned from the program. Roberto is passionate about agriculture. During his childhood and adolescence, he lived with his parents and worked with them on various private farms in Quetzaltenango. His family had to spend all they earned – about three quetzales (40 cents today) a week – so they were never able to pull themselves out of poverty.

03/25/2013 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Ramona's Story in the Dominican Republic

The gentle breeze rustled through the trees on Ramona’s porch in the Dominican Republic as I sat watching her bright eyes, animated voice and gesturing hands explain the preschool and adult literacy classes she leads “right here on this porch”.

12/14/2012 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More