Foods Resource Bank Blog

In West Africa, health & hygiene training … and a chubby baby!

I was completely amazed by the chubby baby in the arms of his mother, who sat across from me at the meeting. I don't think I've ever seen such a healthy looking baby in a village in this region before. What was this woman’s secret to having such a healthy baby, while so many are malnourished?

The baby’s mother, Esther, a participant in FRB’s West Africa 1 program, explained. "In the training I received on health I learned the importance of only giving breast milk for the first six months of a baby's life." The elders in Esther’s village had told young women that their first milk wasn't good, that they needed to throw it out and instead give their newborns water, or pass them to another woman to nurse. "Now we learned that the first milk is so important to give to our babies – that is what helps them grow strong!"

06/28/2013 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Farming Gods Way

In Kenya, this time of year is known as “the hungry months.” It is the period of time from January through June that is often marked by families eating one meal (or no meals) a day as they try to make their food supplies last until the next crop can be harvested. For Dominique and his wife in Ndeiya, Kenya, the hungry months had been a way of life for many years, but not anymore.

06/26/2013 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Para-vets save district cattle in Mozambique

Newsletter: 

Well-trained village para-veterinarians recently staved off a serious outbreak of the disease known as rickettsiosis in the Mozambican province where FRB’s “Cattle Cluster” program is located. The project manager received a government alert and got the message to the para-vets in the seventeen clusters in the affected districts. They immediately treated the cattle to stem the spread of the disease. Such quick action prevented deaths and improved reproduction rates among the program’s cattle.

In Mozambique, cattle is an important safety net against hunger when crops fail.

06/24/2013 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

EthnoArts in Laos

One of FRB's members, World Renew/CRWRC, shared this video with us. While it does not direcly feature participants of the Laos-Xieng Khouang Program, staff from that program did participate in the workshop and their learning will impact the communities in Xieng Khouang. Mark Fennema, a World Renew staff member in Laos, shared more information on the video:

06/21/2013 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Update on Mozambique Tete-Mutarara Program

Update on Mozambique Tete-Mutarara Program, JUNE 2013:

Disaster response measures by World Renew and local partner IRM-RDD did not require food-for-work, as people are still able to eat from the previous season's harvest and there was still time to re-plant for the winter season. The 47 tons of emergency seed aid provided by World Renew include maize, tomato, onion, cabbage, rape, okra and pumpkin seeds.

06/20/2013 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Sirah saves money to start a small business in Sierra Leone

Sirah is one of the most respected farmers in her community today due to her hard work, ingenuity, and how she’s managed the money she’s saved through her SILC (Savings and Internal Lending Community) group. SILCs are supported by Foods Resource Bank’s Sierra Leone-Koinadugu program to enable and encourage farmers to save money for agricultural inputs and starting small businesses.

06/17/2013 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Advocacy in Serbia

In April 2013, CWS hosted a delegation of CWS staff and volunteers from the US who came to visit CWS programs in Serbia and Georgia. In the Serbia-Smederevo program, they witnessed the joint program of CWS, Red Cross Smederevo and Foods Resource Bank providing food assistance and ensuring food security, they toured several pre-schools that provide secure place to young socially vulnerable children, visited the safe house for victims of domestic violence and talked to Smederevo local government officials and CWS local partners.

06/07/2013 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

In Kenya, 10 self-help groups selected as leaders in their communities

To promote greater commitment to agricultural development among the Maasai participants in FRB’s Kenya-Ngong Najile program, ten of the program’s 39 established self-help groups were selected for special training to become “servant leaders” to the others. Their communities will benefit from the stewardship, good examples, knowledge, improved relationships, conflict resolution, and goal-reaching of these groups.

The program addresses food security for these once semi-nomadic, pastoralist people and encourages them to form inclusive groups across gender, age and political lines. The groups participate in trainings on

06/07/2013 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

In Nicaragua, positive change really happens in program communities

“Do you see change taking place in your work?” People often ask me,  as Country Consultant of World Renew (WR) programming in Nicaragua, I recently joined an FRB/WR team that evaluated the Nicaragua-Farmer program in the households “have access to sufficient, safe, and nutritious food during the entire year.” We saw evidence of much positive change among participants, for whom the program’s goal is to ensure that allcentral mountain region of the country.

06/05/2013 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Raising rabbits for survival in Gaza

THE GAZA STRIP is a disputed territory on the eastern coast of the Mediterranean Sea and the most densely populated place on earth: approximately 1,657,155 people in a total area of 365 square kilometers. Conflict, water scarcity, unemployment and environmental pollution from bombs further increase the difficulty of life here and survival, rather than flourishing, appears to be the goal of most of the inhabitants. The FRB/MCC program provides rabbits and training for food and income. An average income for an employed person in Gaza is around $274-$410 USD a month. Rabbits can be sold at 3-4 months of age and can bring in approximately $13-$16 per rabbit. With no place for the animals to burrow or shelter, an unusually cold winter killed many, and fear and stress from a November 2012 bombing killed or affected reproduction in many more of these sensitive animals. FRB staff recently visited the program and spoke with participants.

06/03/2013 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More