frb newsletter

Tis the Season for Season-less Giving

Black Friday is over.

So is Cyber Monday and Small Business Saturday and now, today ... we celebrate Giving Tuesday!

What is Giving Tuesday, you might ask. Well, it’s the day officially designated on which to give back.

12/03/2013 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

In India, Shanti looks forward to improved yields and income

Shanti is a 36-year-old participant in FRB’s India-Patharkhmah program who lives and farms with her husband and son in a small village. They are a poor family, but as a result of their hard work they were able to buy an acre of land on which they cultivated rice.

In 2010 Shanti joined a farmers’ club in her village. She participated in as many club events as she could, including various trainings and exposure visits on kitchen gardens, Sloping Agriculture Land Technology (SALT)

12/02/2013 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Training mothers reduces childhood malnutrition in Peru

Mothers, babies and families participating in FRB’s Perú-Chota program are enjoying improved health through workshops and follow-up on hygiene, home vegetable gardening, nutrition, agriculture, and clean water practices. These rural communities are also securing greater access to basic municipal services , and the program has developed standards for inter-agency coordination between health and educational centers. Hygiene, nutrition and school gardens are a part of school curricula, and mothers and teachers alike have a positive attitude towards the program’s activities.

Over a three-year period, 450 boys and girls under the age of five in the communities have experienced a 9% reduction in chronic and an 11% reduction in overall malnutrition.

11/27/2013 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Four Malawian Farmers Share Their Success Stories

FRB’s Malawi-Chingale program offers extension services and training for crop production, crop diversification, small-scale irrigation, land resource management, and livestock restocking to a community devastated by the 2006 food crisis and high rates of HIV/AIDS. Participants learn appropriate farming practices, and receive further instruction on the environment, health, child nutrition, HIV/AIDS education, community-based child care, and adult literacy.

Here, four farmers tell how the program has helped them improve their lives

11/25/2013 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Getting Ready for the Harsh Winter in Armenia

Newsletter: 

Participants in FRB’s Armenia-Shirak program are benefiting from their sheep in a way most Americans would not think of. Winter temperatures in Shirak Province – remote and mountainous and the coldest area in the country – can plummet to minus 30 degrees F. Families spend much of the year getting ready for this long and severe season. They preserve food by the gallon and keep it in storage for winter, and buy or collect wood in advance. If they have sheep, however, they can use the manure for heating their houses.

The two program communities have received aid and assistance from many sectors since the devastating 1988 earthquake but continue to experience poverty, food insecurity, and shrinking numbers as men and entire families emigrate for work. Armenia-Shirak’s developmental approach takes in the high level of social solidarity

11/22/2013 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

La Roya Epidemic Decimating Livelihoods Dependent on Coffee in Honduras

Please keep the people of Central America and FRB's Honduras Nueva Frontera Program in your thoughts and prayers as they struggle with how the Coffee Rust epidemic is affecting their livelihoods.

Central America is undergoing the worst Coffee Rust plague since 1976. The state of phytosanitary emergency (measures for the control of plant diseases) has been declared in Costa Rica, Guatemala and Honduras.

The Coffee Rust Plague, also known as La Roya, is caused by a fungus that affects the leaves and destroys crops and plants. Once it attacks, the only option for most farmers is to destroy an entire coffee plantation

11/19/2013 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Jackfruit in the Central African Republic

In the large and underdeveloped country of the Central African Republic, access to information is rare and that is why FRB's Central African Republic-Gamboula Program is trialing new varieties of staple crops, vegetables, beans, fruits in order to determine their suitability to local conditions. They introduce successful varieties to communities via farmer cooperatives and train farmers in sustainable farming techniques via farmer-to-farmer extension.

Thanks to the tropical climate and dense forests, a large focus of the Gamboula program is native fruit tree cultivation. This includes many exotic varieties of fruit not commonly seen in North America. On such fruit is called the jackfruit...

11/18/2013 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Planting Pineapples, Harvesting Hope

Check out the video below by World Hope International!

FRB's Sierra Leone - West program works with smallholder farmers who live in the area of a former Internal Displaced Person's camp during the 1991-2002 civil war. Through the cultivation of pineapple, farmers are integrated into the supply chains of export-oriented processing companies.

11/15/2013 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

FRB’s Bev Abma nominated for World Food Prize

Newsletter: 

Bev Abma, FRB’s longtime Executive Director of Overseas Programming, got a big surprise at her August 10, 2013 retirement celebration in Byron Center MI.  Foods Resource Bank had nominated her for the prestigious World Food Prize (WFP) for 2013, in the areas of nutrition, rural development, social organization, and poverty elimination.  The prize is awarded each year to persons who become role models for advancing human development by improving the quality, quantity or availability of food in the world. Doesn’t that fit Bev Abma to a T?

11/13/2013 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Sowing peace, building food security after armed conflict in Colombia

After decades of armed conflict, FRB’s Colombia-Sincelejo program seeks to support human rights and peace building through training in sustainable agriculture, water management, organizational capacity building, and community transformation.The population suffered heavy personal losses during the nearly 50 years of conflict, as a result of the country-wide violence, displacement, corruption, and environmental degradation.

Colombia is now in the process of peace dialogues, and local program staff is committed to standing with the people

11/08/2013 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More
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