Africa

SILC Allows Pa Alie to Open Shop and Open Possibilities in Sierra Leone

Three years ago Alie Bangura, known locally as Pa Alie, was a subsistence farmer and a driver on the side. His fields were unproductive, his family undernourished, and his children uneducated. To make matters worse, when Pa Alie’s vehicle broke down, he could not afford to repair it and therefore lost his job as a driver. Today, however, Pa Alie is a business owner and respected chairman of his SILC (savings and internal loan club)group as part of FRB's Sierra Leone-Koinadugu program.

09/18/2013 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Dusuba's new house! …evidence of SILC Success

Like most others in the village of Gberia Timbakor, Dusuba struggled to meet her family’s necessities––food, shelter, and education. With a husband and six children, her small rice and groundnut farm was not enough to meet those needs. That is, until she joined a SILC group through FRB's Sierra Leone-Koinadugu program. Now, she says, she has overcome all of her obstacles.

08/14/2013 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Culturally relevant agribusiness for smallholder farmers in Sierra Leone

The Sierra Leone-West program is a business-oriented poverty-reduction initiative of World Hope International (WHI) in conjunction with FRB. The program works with smallholder farmers in Sierra Leone to develop sustainable, culturally relevant agribusiness enterprises at the village level, such as growing and selling mangoes and pineapples to a local juice processor.

Communities in the program area are exceedingly vulnerable. Lack of employment among men and women of working age causes poverty. Lack of capital to cultivate food creates food insecurity.

08/02/2013 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Djibo's dreams come true in West Africa

A few years ago, Djibo and his family shared some of their dreams with a visitor. "I hope one day to have a cell phone and a motorcycle, and that our community group can do trickle irrigation," said Djibo. His wives added, "We hope our group can get a mill so we don't have to pound millet all day long." 

Since then, some of these dreams have become reality. Djibo bought a cell phone, which can mean the difference between safety and danger in remote communities, and helps him stay abreast of market pricing and more. Last January, Djibo’s community put in a solar-powered trickle irrigation system. They've begun planting vegetables, including onions and tomatoes, using this new system.

07/22/2013 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

In Kenya, communities build sand dams to address water needs

Pastor Matayo is a community leader in FRB’s Kenya Ngong-Intashat program who was involved in sand dam construction across a seasonal river, from start to finish. The program’s goal is to increase food security by making water more available for household use, livestock and agriculture.

07/19/2013 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

In The Gambia, a sustainable approach is the key to finishing well

As FRB’s multi-phase micro-gardening program in The Gambia comes to a close, participants will be able to carry on confidently with the help of a program-trained Private Service Provider (PSP). The program’s overall goal has been to enhance and sustain the livelihoods of at-risk people in peri-urban and urban areas of The Gambia by promoting soilless, organic, tabletop vegetable production using local resources.

07/12/2013 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

In Uganda, program farmers are well on their way to food security

One farmer’s story

Emmanuel, 47, is now closer to food security for his family thanks to context appropriate ag training and a loan of plant materials from the FRB-supported Uganda-Teso food security program. With the farming technologies he’s learned, he’s produced enough cassava and groundnuts to sell.

07/08/2013 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

In West Africa, health & hygiene training … and a chubby baby!

I was completely amazed by the chubby baby in the arms of his mother, who sat across from me at the meeting. I don't think I've ever seen such a healthy looking baby in a village in this region before. What was this woman’s secret to having such a healthy baby, while so many are malnourished?

The baby’s mother, Esther, a participant in FRB’s West Africa 1 program, explained. "In the training I received on health I learned the importance of only giving breast milk for the first six months of a baby's life." The elders in Esther’s village had told young women that their first milk wasn't good, that they needed to throw it out and instead give their newborns water, or pass them to another woman to nurse. "Now we learned that the first milk is so important to give to our babies – that is what helps them grow strong!"

06/28/2013 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Farming Gods Way

In Kenya, this time of year is known as “the hungry months.” It is the period of time from January through June that is often marked by families eating one meal (or no meals) a day as they try to make their food supplies last until the next crop can be harvested. For Dominique and his wife in Ndeiya, Kenya, the hungry months had been a way of life for many years, but not anymore.

06/26/2013 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Para-vets save district cattle in Mozambique

Newsletter: 

Well-trained village para-veterinarians recently staved off a serious outbreak of the disease known as rickettsiosis in the Mozambican province where FRB’s “Cattle Cluster” program is located. The project manager received a government alert and got the message to the para-vets in the seventeen clusters in the affected districts. They immediately treated the cattle to stem the spread of the disease. Such quick action prevented deaths and improved reproduction rates among the program’s cattle.

In Mozambique, cattle is an important safety net against hunger when crops fail.

06/24/2013 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More
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