coffee

Another View: Changing climate hurts Honduran farmer

My name is Melecio Cantoral Gonzalez. I am 30 years old. I live with my parents, my wife and my two small children. We live in the community of Bella Vista, near Nueva Frontera in Honduras, in a small home made of adobe with a metal roof. It has a kitchen, a living room, and one small bedroom. My wife and I share our room with our children. Together with my family I farm a little more than 4 acres.

I walk about 30 minutes to get to the land I farm, which is on a steep slope. I grow mainly corn, red beans, and coffee. A couple of years earlier I started to plant other crops because of training I had received. I learned that I can’t support my family with just corn and beans and I learned other things, too,

02/24/2015 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Indigenous communities in Mexico work to become self sustaining

In spite of the devastating loss of incomes due to coffee rust and severe drought in the region, hardworking participants in the seven communities of FRB’s Mexico-Chiapas program are managing to produce food for home consumption and sale for income. The program has supplied families with 750-liter water tanks in order to collect rooftop water whenever it does rain.

Doña Angélica said the first rains this year were few and sparse but she was able to fill her tank easily. Afterward, there was a period of 20 days without rain but, she said with joy,

10/07/2014 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Central American coffee farmers vulnerable to climate change

A fungus called la roya, or coffee rust, is creeping throughout Central America, threatening livelihoods for millions of coffee farmers. FRB’s Central American programs are vulnerable to the effects of climate change, and the impact of la roya on the coffee industry. Farmer’s reliant on coffee production are challenged to reconsider a new path in life. To learn more, check out this article from the New York Times, “A Coffee Crop Withers.” Or, to make a difference, visit Equal Exchange, a fair trade organization that provides opportunities to support coffee farmers in Central America. 

06/18/2014 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

La Roya Epidemic Decimating Livelihoods Dependent on Coffee in Honduras

Please keep the people of Central America and FRB's Honduras Nueva Frontera Program in your thoughts and prayers as they struggle with how the Coffee Rust epidemic is affecting their livelihoods.

Central America is undergoing the worst Coffee Rust plague since 1976. The state of phytosanitary emergency (measures for the control of plant diseases) has been declared in Costa Rica, Guatemala and Honduras.

The Coffee Rust Plague, also known as La Roya, is caused by a fungus that affects the leaves and destroys crops and plants. Once it attacks, the only option for most farmers is to destroy an entire coffee plantation

11/19/2013 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More
Syndicate content