cooperative

Co-ops Strengthen Communities in Haiti

A recent internal evaluation of FRB’s Haiti-Northwest program shows that its community cooperatives are helping their members make significant improvements in their lives and livelihoods.

In an area of the country with little government presence, farmer-run cooperatives in the Northwest and Artibonite departments of Haiti help their male and female members to build more resilient households,livelihoods and communities. The program especially focuses on women in their entrepreneurial efforts so that they have greater access to credit, training, and leadership formation opportunities.

09/26/2014 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Local cooperatives fill many important roles in Haitian Communities

Because there is little government presence where FRB’s Haiti-Northwest program is working, local people understand the need to organize for the protection, development and growth of their communities. The twelve program communities have created cooperatives which address the varied needs and concerns of its members.

Training Co-ops provide training on many topics, among them appropriate agricultural techniques like intercropping as a way to take the best advantage of available land and ensure that, if one crop fails, the others might survive. More farmers are planting peanuts, congo beans (pigeon peas), and root crops like manioc (cassava) and sweet potato because of their excellent survival rates.

04/16/2014 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Co-op services help members get ahead in Haiti

Newsletter: 

Members of farmer cooperatives in FRB’s Haiti-Northwest program spoke with recent FRB visitors about how much the program’s co-ops mean in their lives:

Delisia remembers breaking down in tears when her children were kicked out of school for non-payment of fees.  She felt she would have to choose between her children’s education and her livestock. It was a difficult situation. She had livestock, but they weren't ready for market and would fetch a low price if she was forced to sell them. The sale would cover school fees but she wouldn't have any money left over to purchase new animals for fattening.

01/03/2013 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More
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