crop rotation

Home Again: Sustainable Farming Returns Felix to his Roots

My name is Félix. I’m a farmer, but there came a point when I couldn’t support my family anymore. I spent months at a time moving to other parts of the country to find work.  My wife had occasional jobs, but could only earn around 15 cents a day.  We both did what we had to do to support our seven children.  When I heard about an opportunity to receive training on ways to improve my farm and raise more food, I was eager to give it a try.

I made my depleted soil more fertile by planting cover crops and fruit trees, making organic pesticides, fungicides and fertilizer, and rotating crops, and produce a greater variety of fruits and vegetables.

You should see my farm now! I used to grow mainly corn and beans, but now have plantains, sweet potatoes, pineapple, yuca [a tuber], sesame, peanuts, papaya, hot pepper and more.  We eat most of it, but I also sell some so I no longer have to leave my family to make money.  My family’s healthier, too, because food grown in rich soil has more nutrients. I’m also lowering my costs.  My wife encourages me to continue to try new things, and helps me. We believe that you learn by doing. I’m convinced that my land can produce even more.

My hope is that God gives me strength to continue farming my parcel of land so I can leave a sustainable inheritance for my children.  I pray that God continues blessing the donors who make this program possible. I believe that they demonstrate what it really means to love our neighbors.

Photo caption: Felix explains how cover crops replenish soil nutrients

Guatemala Four Departments Program
Led by World Renew and various local partners
25 communities, 750 households, 4, 500 individuals

12/19/2017 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Mulching Means More Maize

Salome spends a lot less time on farm work because the mulching she does suppresses weeds and frees her from hoeing, a task that used to consume most of her time.  

Like most farmers in this dry region of Kenya, Salome’s maize yields were increasingly disappointing until she tried a number of techniques aimed at building soil fertility and retaining moisture.  This harvest, Salome’s production tripled in spite of a lack of rain.  She had improved her soil with such conservation agriculture practices as minimum tillage, applying manure as fertilizer, crop rotation, agroforestry, and using drought-tolerate varieties. But, for Salome, the technique she most appreciates is mulching. With less overall work, her harvest increased from one to four 220-pound bags of maize in the same small plot.

She and other farmers have also started practicing better post-harvest grain handling and storage, including drying maize on tarps in the sun to prevent the poisonous fungus aflatoxin. Many are storing their grain now in hermetically sealed bags that prevent moisture and pests without chemicals. Higher yields and reduced post-harvest losses mean more overall food for their families, more to sell, and more to plant the following year.

Participant farmers are also planting trees to produce fruit, fuel, wood, shade, and mulching materials. All these and other improved practices are taught at the program’s two hands-on Farmer Field Schools and disseminated through their communities by trained facilitators. When they see the great results that conservation farming yields, area farmers go on to put their new knowledge to work on their own farms.

Kenya Tigania encompasses 7 Communities, 200 Households, 1,000 Individuals
Led by World Renew and local partner ADS - Mt Kenya

09/14/2017 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More
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