Honduras

Community Voices

“Having to leave the country to look for work is a huge cost, financially and in terms of the family and community, and people often return no better off than when they left. This program has made it possible for us to earn a living at home. Now we can say, ‘Here in Honduras there are riches.’ We didn’t go buy this food in the market. We produced it ourselves. That, to me, is being rich.” – Rafael

“We are grateful for [local partner] CASM because they work on a personal level in solidarity with families who have few resources. They encourage us to contribute our own efforts to carry out various community projects. They offer alternatives that are changing the way we live.” – Lilian  

“I’d never imagined that anything could be so effective for cooking as an eco-stove and also keep the smoke out of the house. It used to be impossible to control the smoke in the house with our traditional stoves. It damaged the roof and made the air unhealthy to breathe. The eco-stoves are energy efficient and economical – look at how few pieces of wood there are in there, but that’s all I’ll use all day to cook! Before, my husband was constantly carrying firewood for me. Now even he gets a rest.” – Lurbin

“I feel that we have achieved many changes in our community. Before, because we are so remote and it’s hard to get here, no government or international organizations ever came to offer us support. But this program has helped us so much. I feel really content and proud that I am improving my family’s nutrition and can even share all the products I have been able to grow. Greetings to all the donors who make this program possible, and thank you!” – Miguel Angel

Caption: Lurbin and her new eco-stove

Honduras Nueva Frontera
Led by Church World Service and Local Partner Comisión de Acción Social Menonita (CASM)
14 communities, 626 households, 3,130 individuals

04/09/2018 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Beekeeping Proves to be One Honey of an Opportunity

My name is Sara.  I live with my husband, José, and our two daughters, 8 and 5. We recently learned beekeeping through the program, and we love it! Once you’re set up, the bees do all the work to make the honey. We harvest every 15-20 days in the summer, anywhere from two to 60 one-quart bottles, depending on how many coffee trees are flowering around our hives. Our honey is high quality, and we can sell it for a good price – $6.00 a quart. The money allows us to buy food and medicines, and we’ve noticed that eating honey keeps us healthier, too.

José breaks rocks in the quarry for construction, and we both work as laborers during the coffee harvest. So, when [local partner] PAG offered training in beekeeping or raising pigs, chickens or tilapia, we started dreaming about earning more by selling honey.

Initially, we spent time with a beekeeping family in another community, learning about bee management and honey production. After that orientation, PAG gave us technical training, two beehives, and bee-handling equipment. Once we had a little practice, we began to find and capture natural bee swarms in the mountains, and expanded our honeybee operations to ten double-box hives in less than a year. We are preparing two extra hives to give to the next family as part of the “pass it on” program run by PAG.

Our goal is to have 30 double-box hives to provide us with a good additional income for our family. We’re thankful to God and the program for this opportunity.

Photo caption: José shows the family’s double-box hives

Honduras Comayagua Program
Led by Church of the Brethren and Local Partner Proyecto Aldea Global (PAG)
22 communities, 180 households, 1,960 individuals

02/06/2018 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Every Family has a Story of Struggle and Triumph

FRB’s local partner CASM says, “When you see tables in reports about program progress, you just see numbers of participants -- this many men, this many women, this many children. We never forget that each number represents a person or a family, each family or individual is unique, and each one has a story of struggles and triumphs.”

Take Doña María, for example. Yes, she counts as a program participant, but she is also a valued leader in her community. She is always motivating other women to try new things like energy-efficient stoves, organizing a training event on vegetable gardens, or attending a reforestation rally or a nutrition workshop. She is a highly motivated person who always thinks about others first. At the same time, she is a widow caring for three grandchildren aged 12, 9, and 7 since their mothers migrated to the city looking for jobs.

The program includes supporting rural families in improving the sanitation, health and hygiene condition in their homes. María has helped many neighbors’ families get access to a stove, cement flooring, or latrines.  Her neighbors encouraged her to be a recipient as well.

Said María on the day materials for her latrine were delivered, “This is a day of great joy for us who live in a village forgotten by the authorities but supported by FRB.  We are happy because in one week we will build our latrines. We invite you to come into our homes to show you how this program has supported our families and changed our lives for the better.  We thank you very much."


Honduras Nueva Frontera program
Led by Church World Service and local partner CASM
14 Communities, 626 Households, 3,130 Individuals

Story and photo courtesy Church World Service

10/23/2017 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Another View: Changing climate hurts Honduran farmer

My name is Melecio Cantoral Gonzalez. I am 30 years old. I live with my parents, my wife and my two small children. We live in the community of Bella Vista, near Nueva Frontera in Honduras, in a small home made of adobe with a metal roof. It has a kitchen, a living room, and one small bedroom. My wife and I share our room with our children. Together with my family I farm a little more than 4 acres.

I walk about 30 minutes to get to the land I farm, which is on a steep slope. I grow mainly corn, red beans, and coffee. A couple of years earlier I started to plant other crops because of training I had received. I learned that I can’t support my family with just corn and beans and I learned other things, too,

02/24/2015 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Despite drought & severe food shortages, FRB programs are alleviating the need to migrate

By Laurie Kaniarz, FRB Staff

If you are a Foods Resource Bank (FRB) volunteer, supporter, friend, or staff, you are part of a grassroots movement that is helping people resist migration to cities or other countries to look for work to sustain their families back home. Our focus on agricultural development for small-holder farmers helps them find and practice real solutions to challenges like

09/15/2014 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Careful farm planing brings big rewards in Honduras

Malecio is a 27-year-old farmer in rural Honduras who lives in a mountainous part of the country, three hours from the closest paved road, with his wife and two children. Earlier this year, Malecio heard about sustainable smallholder ag training through FRB’s Honduras-Nueva Frontera program. He was interested in the training because he had seen other farmers in the area using the new methods, and their crops looked and produced much better than his. So he got in touch with Cesar, an extension agent who works for CASM, FRB’s local partner.

When Cesar came to look at his farm, Malecio explained to him that he was planting only corn, beans, and coffee, the yields were never enough to make it through the year, and low coffee prices meant that he wasn't able to purchase the food his family

04/04/2014 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Prayer Request from Honduras-Nueva Frontera Program

Dear Friends, 
Below is a prayer request for our partner staff with Honduras-Nueva Frontera program.  Many have met Delmis during travels with FRB. She recently notified us that violence has suddenly erupted in Nueva Frontera. 

Due to food scarcity and lack of employment people are becoming desperate and crime had been steadily rising.  Organized criminal groups are now vying for control of the area and robberies are becoming quite common.

03/10/2014 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

La Roya Epidemic Decimating Livelihoods Dependent on Coffee in Honduras

Please keep the people of Central America and FRB's Honduras Nueva Frontera Program in your thoughts and prayers as they struggle with how the Coffee Rust epidemic is affecting their livelihoods.

Central America is undergoing the worst Coffee Rust plague since 1976. The state of phytosanitary emergency (measures for the control of plant diseases) has been declared in Costa Rica, Guatemala and Honduras.

The Coffee Rust Plague, also known as La Roya, is caused by a fungus that affects the leaves and destroys crops and plants. Once it attacks, the only option for most farmers is to destroy an entire coffee plantation

11/19/2013 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Reaching out to the needy in Honduras, despite violence

AKRON, Pa – Like the biblical widow who faithfully offered her mite, a tiny Brethren in Christ (BIC) association in the hot, arid, mountainous area of southern Honduras has been working selflessly with neighbors in spite of growing violence and changing weather patterns. Honduras now has the highest homicide rate in the world according to 2011 U.N. figures – 82 per 100,000 inhabitants per year – and the prevailing lawlessness caused the U.S. Peace Corps to withdraw its volunteers from the Central American country in January.

With Mennonite Central Committee’s (MCC) support, the Social Development Committee of the Brethren in Christ churches in Honduras, known as CODESO, is teaching farmers how to store crops, providing microloans and offering agricultural training – all to develop a more reliable food supply and income.

02/04/2013 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More
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