rabbits

Rabbits Replace Desperation with Hope

When Nehal was notified that her family was given priority to receive rabbits and training, her stress-related health conditions started to subside. She had been at her wits’ end trying feed and manage all the daily struggles experienced by her family of seven without a source of income. With instruction on animal husbandry and small business management, she soon had enough rabbits for food, and more to sell to take care of household expenses. And her children, whose school attendance and grades had suffered, are now better able to focus on their studies.

Despite deteriorating living conditions and the lack of employment opportunities in Gaza, 100% of the families involved in the rabbit program have managed to add variety to their meals and increase their weekly intake of protein. This in a context in which at least 92% of the population must resort to such coping strategies as reducing portion sizes or number of meals, eating market leftovers or purchasing food on credit. According to latest data provided by the Socio-Economic and Food Security Survey, 47% of the population across the Gaza Strip are either moderately or severely food insecure and struggling to meet food needs. Local partner Al Najd identifies families experiencing the greatest need and offers instruction and support.

Sabren, too, is pleased and grateful to begin the process of breeding rabbits to improve her children’s diet and earn money. She lives with her family of eight in an overcrowded apartment, and her husband is unemployed. She’s thrilled with the fast progress she’s made in learning basic rabbit care and feeding, and is already able to include this rich protein source in weekly meals.  As she completes training in small business management she’ll be able to sell some to relieve the tight financial situation they’ve been living in.  For Sabren, the biggest reward is the smiles on her children’s faces.

Caption: Sabren’s rabbit operation

Palestine Gaza Program
Led by Mennonite Central Committee and local partner Al Najd
12 communities, 255 households, 1,785 individuals

04/12/2018 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Palestine-Gaza Conflict & Flooding Update

Newsletter: 

The recent conflict in Gaza, which started on July 8, 2014, comes shortly after major flooding in the region this winter.  The local partner and participants in FRB's Palestine-Gaza program have been focusing on how best to manage these immediate threats to livelihoods while still trying to maintain a development focus.  

On February 2nd 2014, FRB granted an additional request for funding which allowed participants to rebuild rabbit shelters and replace livestock that were lost or destroyed in the severe floods.

08/29/2014 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

In Palestine, rabbits mean improved nutrition for children

Participants in FRB's Palestine/Gaza program are learning to raise rabbits in order to improve their family's income and health status. The Hashem's use the money from the sale of these cotton-tailed critters to pay for school uniforms and supplies for their seven children. Read their story here! 

07/21/2014 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Raising rabbits for survival in Gaza

THE GAZA STRIP is a disputed territory on the eastern coast of the Mediterranean Sea and the most densely populated place on earth: approximately 1,657,155 people in a total area of 365 square kilometers. Conflict, water scarcity, unemployment and environmental pollution from bombs further increase the difficulty of life here and survival, rather than flourishing, appears to be the goal of most of the inhabitants. The FRB/MCC program provides rabbits and training for food and income. An average income for an employed person in Gaza is around $274-$410 USD a month. Rabbits can be sold at 3-4 months of age and can bring in approximately $13-$16 per rabbit. With no place for the animals to burrow or shelter, an unusually cold winter killed many, and fear and stress from a November 2012 bombing killed or affected reproduction in many more of these sensitive animals. FRB staff recently visited the program and spoke with participants.

06/03/2013 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Conservation Farming and Rabbits Improve Nutrition and Income in Kenya

Dominique, a participant farmer in FRB’s Kenya-Ndeiya program, is gradually turning over his conventional 3-acre piece of land to conservation agriculture (CA). He’s become a role model for other farmers in the using CA, or Farming God’s Way (FGW), as it’s also known. Zero tillage plus mulch retains moisture; crop rotation helps to prevent diseases; organic fertilizer renews the soil and saves money; and inter-cropping wards off insects.

02/20/2013 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More
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