loans

Transforming Challenges into Opportunities

“Being members of a farmers’ group and saving money with them has transformed my family’s challenges into opportunities,” says Ouga, an elderly farmer who participates in the Uganda Teso program.

Ouga and his wife, Janet, have ten children. They joined a farmers’ group in 2016 to receive training on a variety of sustainable agricultural practices. As their tomatoes, maize and cassava started yielding more, they began saving money with other members through the group’s Village Savings and Lending Association.

“In the first year, we just saved a little money. What opened our eyes was that the members who had saved more received a substantial amount of money as a dividend at the end of the cycle! In fact, they were even able to buy cattle!”

Seeing their fellow farmers’ success triggered Ouga and Janet’s desire to put away more money. At the end of the second-year payout cycle, Ouga’s family received enough to buy a bull for plowing.

“That same year, we got a loan from the group and purchased doors and windows for the house we were constructing as a family,” Ouga said. “We are also now able to pay school fees and cover other expenses. For so many years – even into my old age – I have struggled to provide for my family, with little and sometimes no success. Now I realize it was mainly because of my ignorance and sticking to traditional thinking and practices,” he says.

Caption: Janet and Ouga harvesting cassava

Uganda Teso Program
Led by World Renew and local partner PAG KIDO

08/28/2018 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Djibo's dreams come true in West Africa

A few years ago, Djibo and his family shared some of their dreams with a visitor. "I hope one day to have a cell phone and a motorcycle, and that our community group can do trickle irrigation," said Djibo. His wives added, "We hope our group can get a mill so we don't have to pound millet all day long." 

Since then, some of these dreams have become reality. Djibo bought a cell phone, which can mean the difference between safety and danger in remote communities, and helps him stay abreast of market pricing and more. Last January, Djibo’s community put in a solar-powered trickle irrigation system. They've begun planting vegetables, including onions and tomatoes, using this new system.

07/22/2013 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

In Uganda, program farmers are well on their way to food security

One farmer’s story

Emmanuel, 47, is now closer to food security for his family thanks to context appropriate ag training and a loan of plant materials from the FRB-supported Uganda-Teso food security program. With the farming technologies he’s learned, he’s produced enough cassava and groundnuts to sell.

07/08/2013 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Small Loans, Big Impact for Colombian Farmers

Newsletter: 

Jorge’s entire farm is visible from the ridge above it, as it falls down the steep slope and into the curving valley around a small stream. All told, Jorge cultivates about two hectares of land in a rotation of corn, rice, and two staple root crops, cassava and ñame (yam), of which he sells a part in the local market and keeps the rest to feed himself and his family. He farms all of the land by hand, using simple tools like machetes and hoes to clear brush off the steep slopes and loosen up the soil in pockets which he then plants by hand. Jorge is truly a small-scale farmer.

11/28/2012 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More
Syndicate content